6 Best Educational Books Recommended By Top Teachers Around The World

Book reading is not everyone’s cup of tea. But to be able to gain the wealth of knowledge you should be willing to develop the book reading habits. I know what you are thinking, “I have got the Internet, why should I bother with books”, to that my answer is, if that were the case was there ever the need for Kindle app.

To help you understand the importance of book reading, you must first learn to appreciate that writing a book is not an easy thing. A writer has to delve deep into his experiences as well as has to tap into his knowledge base gathered over a number of years to come up with engaging content that readers would find worthy of their time.

It is not necessary that every book has to be historically correct, that is why we have a genre called fiction. Some are autobiographies, while others are memoirs, some are fictitious accounts that entail storytelling which hooks the reader with its mystery and character development. Heck, countless books are at the helm of biggest Hollywood blockbusters.

The list that follows details few of the finest educational books and they are as under:

1. Mindset: The New Psychology of Success

It was authored by Stanford University’s Carol Dweck who is one of the leading psychologist world has produced. The book details how the power of the mind can really influence our success and in turn, achievements.

The accomplishments are not a direct result of our doings or talents or skills (not all the time at least). Instead, they are a result of our ability to think either with a fixed or open mind. Naturally, a fixed mind does not take risks and feels safe in its comfort zone. A growth mind will look to improvise and will not shy away from taking risks.

As you must have guessed by now that our frame of mind is responsible for our success. She argues that if our kids are taught the power of having the right mindset they can employ this early on and can greatly benefit from it in terms of their grades and personal goals in life.

2. Notice and Note: Strategies for Close Reading

The book is written by Kylene Beers and Bob Probst. It packs 6 “signposts” that serve as the indicators for students whereby they realize key moments in a work of literature that propels students to read with utmost attention.

This exercise prepares them to be ready for when these signposts arrive in the text while they are reading and inculcates in the students the habit of question them. Once they start questioning they will also seek to come up with the interpretations of their own. It is not about being right or wrong rather about noticing and noting on students’ part.

3. The Courage to Teach: Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher’s Life

This is one is for the teachers by the seasoned teachers. The book argues that good teaching habit is not some technique that can be learned but it is ingrained in the identity and integrity of the one who is teaching. There can be a number of arguments telling you how good teaching is done but good teachers have a common trait; they are in genuinely present in their classrooms are involved with their students and the subject at hand.

4. Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

The idea that people can be motivated by merely compensating financially is thwarted in this book by Daniel H. Pink. He argues that it is not the carrot-and-stick approach that motivates human beings rather it is the ability to function autonomously. Trusting and giving a chance to do something extraordinary is the real driver behind motivation (be at home, school or history dissertation).

His research spans over four decades and Pink has been able to establish that there is no direct correlation between science and business. To him, three drivers of motivation are autonomy (as stated), mastery and purpose. When these align, you will observe the transformation of thought process and birth innovative means getting things done.

5. Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World

The person behind is an expert from Harvard, Tom Wagner. In his book, he explores ways whereby parents, teachers, and employers can devise methods to nurture young minds. He contests in his book that adult supervision in the lives of youngsters greatly influence how things pan out for them when they grow up.

If the adults in their lives encourage creativity and imagination in them, they are bound to make use of the two and do something extraordinary in their lives. If not then studies reveal they’ll be pretty mediocre in their approach towards life.

Adults are also responsible for teaching young guns how to stand your ground in the case of failures and learn from mistakes, on how to persevere in the face of adversity etc. The author, hence, takes us on to the journey across forward-thinking schools and workplaces showing how productive pupils really become where parents, employers, and teachers encourage learning by innovation.

6. Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking

Often introverts are mistaken for shy and lonely people which is not true. They are less talkative but by no means lonely or “abnormal”. And what is normal by the way, argues the author? Is it the genes (beauty, physique), power (good fortune, degree) or being extremely popular. Bill Gates is an introvert and we don’t see him qualify for any of the aforesaid traits. He became popular after he made his mark while being an introvert (and now he went back and earned that degree as well).

So the catalysts of chance are not only extroverts and Susan Cain explains how this misnomer has become deep rooted in our culture. She masterfully introduces us to a number of introverts and details of their accounts on how they turned out to be wildly successful. Her work is excellently researched, argued with passion, and the real life examples make it all the more worth a read.

Author Bio: Joe Pirest is a teacher by profession. You can contact him for dissertation help company by following him via his Twitter handle.

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